German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2050
Fax: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2055 / 7404 5573

URI: https://www.ghil.ac.uk

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Call for Papers


From the Ruins of Preservation: A symposium on rethinking heritage through counter-archives

London, 11-12 July 2019

Closing date: 1 November 2018

Venue: German Historical Institute London

Co-organized by Rodney Harrison (AHRC Heritage Priority Area Leadership Fellow/Professor of Heritage Studies at the UCL Institute of Archaeology) and Mirjam Brusius (Research Fellow in Colonial and Global History) German Historical Institute of London.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers

  • Rachel Ama Asaa Engmann, Assistant Professor of African Studies, Hampshire College
  • Trinidad Rico, Director of Cultural Heritage and Preservation Studies, Rutgers University
  • Karen Salt, Director of the Centre for Research in Race and Rights (C3R), University of Nottingham

Colonial legacies in heritage preservation have intersected and clashed with local realities since their inception. Heritage sites have often been created by way of processes which segregate them both temporally and geographically from the contemporary world, and the people who live with and amongst them. This might result in restrictions of habitation and cultivation, religious and ritual practice, and the removal of entire local settlements from inside and around natural and cultural heritage sites. Individuals and communities, however, have always had their own ways of preserving and engaging with material and immaterial significances. Objects, places and landscapes were and are embedded and reactivated in the domains of contemporary life. These realities defy and challenge the disciplinary baggage, canons and categories as well as prevailing methods, discourses, concepts and practices of heritage studies, which in many cases have proved unhelpful in engaging such records outside of “the archive” as it is conventionally understood.

Palmyra (Tadmor). Street of village in Temple of the Sun (LC-DIG-matpc-01426, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division).

The problem of adequately engaging the histories of these intersections has been exacerbated by methodological challenges. Historians have long ignored the gaps and unspoken emotions and bodies in written and visual archival sources. Visual analyses often lack the methods to engage with different iterations of the diverse and heterogenous agencies of both humans and nonhumans outside of the scope of official archives—the locals going about their lives in ancient ruins; the workers who labour on archaeological excavations; those often nameless individuals who serve as human scales next to an excavated building; the local guides who help “open up” landscapes to preservationists; or the agencies and affordances of forms of material culture themselves. Due to a turn against the forms of authority empowered in conventional archival sources, critical heritage studies have largely denied the usefulness and significance of archives for the study of such non-official forms of heritage preservation, which has led to the de-privileging of historical and visual analysis. This frustration has resulted in a general turning away from such sources by researchers within heritage studies to focus on contemporary issues, and their accompanying methods, especially “oral history” and ethnography. However, this move has frustrated historians who have seen heritage studies as a field in which the historical contexts of the contemporary phenomena which such scholars study has been effectively written out of the picture.

In order to address these issues, we are seeking contributions for a symposium (to be held at the German Historical Institute of London) and linked edited volume that aims to reconstruct new histories and viewpoints in order to re-examine the “ruins of preservation” and to rethink the varied agencies—both human and non-human—which surround both natural and cultural heritage preservation practices through new conceptual and methodological approaches. We expect such papers to engage with a range of alternative sources and counter-archives (neglected aspects of photography; engagement with more-than-human agents; rethinking objects, landscape and built environment as archives), and/or to discuss new approaches to oral and public history. Re-engaging such histories is not only important in building a new historical approach to heritage, but will also help researchers to reconceptualise and recontextualise contemporary heritage phenomena. By re-centring the discourse about “heritage” to examine specific non-state practices (or conflicts between state and non-state practices) through such methods we also seek a more nuanced and effective understanding of how preservation has been determined over time and from different perspectives. Papers should thus present a methodological intervention into reductionist preservation histories by developing a new diachronic, more diverse vocabulary and directions for future research in and on this field.

Please send abstracts for 300-400 words and queries to: fromtheruinsofpreservation(ghi)gmail.com.

Deadline for paper proposals: November 1, 2018. Speakers will be notified in late November. We have a modest budget to cover travel for participants who require this; please indicate whether you would need to have your travel covered when you send your abstracts, and where you would be travelling from. All accepted participants will have their accommodation covered in London for three nights.

Download Call for Papers (PDF file)

Link to conference website at heritage-research.org


Workshop on Medieval Germany

Venue: German Historical Institute London
Date: 17 May 2019

Deadline: 14 January 2019

Organised by the German Historical Institute London in co-operation with the German Historical Institute Washington and the German History Society.

A one-day workshop on Medieval Germany will be held at the German Historical Institute, Bloomsbury Square, London, on Friday 17 May 2019. It will provide an opportunity for researchers in the field from the UK, continental Europe, and the USA to meet in a relaxed and friendly setting and to learn more about each other’s work. Proposals for short papers are invited from researchers at all career stages with an interest in any aspect of the history of medieval Germany (generously defined). Papers should be 10-15 minutes in length, and will be followed by discussion. Contributors are encouraged to concentrate upon introducing current work in progress, focusing on research questions, approaches, and still-unresolved problems.

Attendance is also warmly invited from anyone with an interest in medieval German history wishing to hear the papers and participate in the discussion. Further details of times and programme will be posted in due course.

The workshop is sponsored by the German History Society and the German Historical Institute London in cooperation with the GHI Washington. Participation is free, including lunch. However, participants will have to bear costs for travel and accommodation themselves.

Doctoral students from North America (USA and Canada) who wish to present at the workshop can apply for two travel funding grants provided by the GHI Washington. Please indicate your interest in this grant in your application.

Support for postgraduate and early career researchers from the United Kingdom and The Republic of Ireland is available on a competitive basis, subject to eligibility requirements. Postgraduate members of the German Historical Society currently registered for a higher degree at a university in the United Kingdom or the Republic of Ireland, and those who have completed a PhD within two years of the deadline for application but who have no other institutional sources of funding may apply for up to £150 for travel and accommodation expenses. Please see the GHS website (http://www.germanhistorysociety.org/postgraduates/) for further information and application deadlines.

Please send proposals (title and ca. 200-word abstract), by Monday 14 January 2019, to Dr Cornelia Linde at the German Historical Institute: (linde(ghi)ghil.ac.uk)

Informal inquiries regarding all aspects of the workshop should be sent to Len Scales (l.e.scales(ghi)durham.ac.uk)

All students and academic researchers interested in medieval German history are very welcome to attend. There is no charge for attendance but due to limited space booking is essential. Please RSVP to Carole Sterckx: sterckx(ghi)ghil.ac.uk

Call for Papers (PDF file)


 


 

Medieval History Seminar

Venue: German Historical Institute London
Date: 10-12 October 2019

Deadline: 31 Januar 2019

Organised by the German Historical Institute London and the German Historical Institute Washington, D.C.

Conveners: Paul Freedman (Yale), Bernhard Jussen (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main), Simon MacLean (St Andrews), Ruth Mazo Karras (Trinity College Dublin), Len Scales (Durham University), and Dorothea Weltecke (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main).

The German Historical Institutes in London and Washington, D.C., are pleased to announce the eleventh Medieval History Seminar, to be held in London from 10 to 12 October 2019. The seminar is designed to bring together Ph.D. candidates and recent Ph.D. recipients (2018) in medieval history from American, Canadian, British, Irish and German universities for three days of scholarly discussion and collaboration. They will have the opportunity to present their work to their peers as well as to distinguished scholars from both sides of the Atlantic. Conveners for the 2019 seminar will be Paul Freedman (Yale University), Bernhard Jussen (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main), Simon MacLean (University of St Andrews), Ruth Mazo Karras (Trinity College Dublin), Len Scales (Durham University), and Dorothea Weltecke (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main).

The Medieval History Seminar welcomes proposals from all areas of medieval history. Participation is not limited to historians working on German history or German-speaking regions of Europe. Nor is a particular epoch or methodological approach preferred. Applications from neighbouring disciplines are welcome if the projects have a distinct historical focus.

The seminar is bi-lingual, and papers and discussions will be conducted both in German and English. Participants must have a good reading and aural comprehension of both languages. Successful applicants must be prepared to submit a paper of approximately 5000 words by 1 September 2019. They are also expected to act as commentator for other papers presented in the seminar.

The GHI will cover the travel and lodging expenses of the participants.

Applications may be submitted in German or English and should include:

  • a curriculum vitae (including institutional affiliation, address and e-mail);
  • a description of the proposed paper (4-5 pages, double-spaced);
  • one letter of recommendation.

Send applications, if possible as one pdf-document, per e-mail to: sterckx(ghi)ghil.ac.uk

German Historical Institute
17 Bloomsbury Square
Tel. +44-(0)20-7309 2050
London WC1A 2NJ (UK)
FAX +44-(0)20-7309 2055

The deadline for submission is 31 January 2019.

For further information, please contact Dr. Cornelia Linde, GHI London, e-mail: inde@ghil.ac.uk

Call for Papers (PDF file)