German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2050
Fax: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2055 / 7404 5573

URI: https://www.ghil.ac.uk

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Seminars

Public Lectures

European Leo Baeck Lecture Series


Seminars and Lectures

The GHIL regularly holds seminars and lectures on topics of general interest to British and German historians. Seminars are held Tuesdays at 5.30pm during term time. Seminar papers are normally presented in English; knowledge of the German language is not necessary for participation.

28 February

Richard Reid (London)
Mourning and Glory: Emotions and the Historical Imaginary in Africa and Europe

This lecture is concerned with the historical imagination in, and about, Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and explores cultures of temporality and historicity through the lens of emotions. It proposes that owing to alternately melancholic, pessimistic, and nostalgic perspectives on the African past, African history has been steadily displaced and foreshortened in the modern era.

Richard Reid is Professor of the History of Africa at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has published widely on political history, historical culture, and warfare and militarism in Africa. He is the author of a history of modern Uganda (forthcoming 2017) and co-editor of the Oxford Handbook of Modern African History (2013).

14 March

Jo Fox (Durham)
Careless Talk? Rumour and the Second World War

Belligerent nations went to considerable lengths to trace, document, and contain rumours. Rumour-mongering was universally denounced as a pathological, destructive condition that threatened the war effort. This lecture will argue that, on the contrary, rumour is an inherently human behaviour that offers an insight into complex human behaviours, motivations, and mentalities at times of crisis.

Jo Fox is Professor of Modern History at Durham University. She specializes in the history of propaganda in the twentieth century. Her publications include Film Propaganda in Britain and Nazi Germany: World War II Cinema (2007) and (with David Welch) Justifying War: Propaganda, Politics and the Modern Age (2012). Her present research focuses on rumour in the First and Second World Wars.

Seminars are held at 5.30 p.m. in the Seminar Room of the German Historical Institute.
Tea is served from 5.00 p.m. in the Common Room, and wine is available after the seminars.

Guided tours of the Library are available before each seminar at 4.30 p.m.

Download the list of Seminars Spring 2017   (PDF file)


Public Lectures 2017

9 March
(5.30pm)

Britta Schilling (Utrecht)
Germany’s Colonial Material

GHIL in co-operation with the Seminar in Modern German History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London

This talk will consider the relationship between German colonialism and material culture. It will argue for the importance of the material in attempts to establish and maintain German political power and cultural identity in its overseas empire between 1884 and 1919 and beyond. It will also consider the utility of material culture analysis for understanding more recent developments in ‘postcolonial’ Germany.

Britta Schilling is Assistant Professor of Cultural History at Utrecht University. She is the author of Postcolonial Germany: Memories of Empire in a Decolonized Nation (2014) and ‘German Postcolonialism in Four Dimensions: A Historical Perspective’, Postcolonial Studies, 18 / 4 (2015). She is currently working on a comparative history of European homes in sub-Saharan Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Download flyer   (PDF file)

If not otherwise stated, lectures are held in the Seminar Room of the German Historical Institute.
Tea is served from 5.00 p.m. in the Common Room, and wine is available after the lectures.


European Leo Baeck Lecture Series London, 2016-17

The Legacy of the Left and Israel: 1967-2017

This season´s topic intends to discuss the complicated and multi-layered relationship of the European Left with Zionism and the State of Israel. We will examine this broad subject from a historical perspective and will shed light on the different debates in various European countries.

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