German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2050
Fax: +44 (0)20 - 7309 2055 / 7404 5573

URI: https://www.ghil.ac.uk

calendar & information

Breadcrumb navigation:

Previous Public Lectures 2016

3 February
(5.30pm)

Sandrine Kott (Geneva)
The Internationalization of the German Welfare State: Germany and the ILO (1890–1953)

GHIL in co-operation with the Faculty of History, University of Oxford

From 1890 the field of social policy and the construct of a ‘German social model’ became central elements in the general process of internationalization in modern Europe. The lecture will analyse the roles of Germany and the ILO as the main driving forces in the internationalization and de-nationalization of the German ‘social model’ during the 1920s and after 1945. The lecture will explore what the complex relations of exchange and interaction between international organizations and nation-states can tell historians about the dynamics of internationalization in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Sandrine Kott is Professor of Modern European History at the University of Geneva. Her research focuses on the history of social welfare in a transnational perspective. Her recent publications include Globalizing Social Rights: The International Labour Organization and Beyond (2013), and Sozialstaat und Gesellschaft: Das deutsche Kaiserreich in Europa (2014).

Download flyer   (PDF file)

3 March
(5.30pm)

Jörg Baberowski (Berlin)
Spaces of Violence

GHIL in co-operation with the Seminar in Modern German History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London

The lecture challenges our cultural beliefs about extreme violence. Modern societies tend to think of violence as an aberration that can be banned—yet violence is a contingent part of social relations that can only be contained, but never abolished, as the lecture will argue. From the wish to contain violence follows the need for order: building on these insights, the lecture will explore the interconnectedness of extreme violence, political orders, and political spaces.

Jörg Baberowski is Professor of East European History at Humboldt University, Berlin. He has published widely on tsarist Russia, Stalinism, and the dynamics between states, political spaces, and extreme violence. His current research focuses on Nikita Khrushchev and the process of de-Stalinization. He is the author of Der Feind ist überall: Stalinismus im Kaukasus (2003); Der Rote Terror: Die Geschichte des Stalinismus (2004); Räume der Gewalt (2015); and Scorched Earth: Stalin’s Reign of Terror (forthcoming 2016).

Download flyer   (PDF file)

26 May
(5.30pm)

Uffa Jensen (Berlin)
Did Freud Really Invent Psychoanalysis? A Global History in Berlin, London, and Calcutta 1910–1940

GHIL in co-operation with the Seminar in Modern German History, Institute of Historical Research, University of London

The lecture discusses the transnational history of psychoanalysis by examining therapeutic practices in Berlin, London, and Calcutta. By situating the major protagonists in a wider therapeutic culture, complex issues of the diffusion of knowledge and practices emerge. Studying a non-Western setting like Calcutta challenges many assumptions about the history of psychoanalysis, among them Freud’s pivotal role in it.

Uffa Jensen is a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for the History of Emotions at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. He is currently writing a global history of psychoanalysis from the perspective of the history of emotions. His publications include Das Selbst zwischen Anpassung und Befreiung: Psychowissen und Politik im 20. Jahrhundert, edited with Maik Tändler (2012); and Rationalisierungen des Gefühls: Zum Verhältnis von Wissenschaft und Emotionen 1880–1930, edited with Daniel Morat (2008).

Download flyer   (PDF file)

23 June
(5.30pm)

Pradip K Datta (Delhi)
A Labour of Love: The Theology of Work and Rabindranath Tagore’s Sriniketan experiment

TRG Event

Venue: German Historical Institute London

This presentation will situate Rabindranath Tagore’s commitment to work, especially physical labour, in some of the discourses of work in nineteenth century Indian thinkers. Proceeding from here, it will explore Tagore’s conception of work in terms of his theology of love which is really a conception of human existence as relational. This is a theology that begins from metaphysical premises and ends with theologizing the human. The theology frames his practical experiments in rural self-dependence or atmashakti. Tagore began some startling experiments in reorganizing labour techniques and the institutional conditions of work in his zamindari estates. While referring to these, the main focus will be on an exploration of the experiments that were conducted in the rural wing of Viswabharati, his global university. Beginning with an evaluation of the way in which Sriniketan was conceived as an attempt to reformulate the relationship between the mainly bhadralok dominated Santiniketan and its surrounding villages, the speaker will look at the interpenetration of the practices of work, leisure and intersubjective relationships and will then go on to examine the ethics and modalities of redistribution of value produced by labour especially through co-operatives and finally look at the problematic ambition of situation Sriniketan in a relationship of both autonomy and interdependence in relationship to the market and the state.

Pradip K Datta is a Professor at the Centre for Comparative Politics and Political Theory of the School of International Studies, JNU Delhi. His research interests include communal Identity formations in modern India; internationalism/cosmopolitanism; history and time. He has authored and edited a number of books and articles. These include the volumes Khaki Shorts Saffron Flags: A Study of the Hindu Right, Delhi, Orient Longman, 1993 (co-authored with T.Basu, S.Sarkar, T.Sarkar, S.Sen), Carving Blocs: Communal Ideology in Early Twentieth-century Bengal, Oxford University Press, 1999, and Volume III: Indian Political Thought, ICSSR Research Survey and Explorations, Volumes in Political, co-authored with Achin Vanaik and Sanjay Palshikar, Oxford University Press, 2013. Among the many articles he has written is “Sriniketan’s Co-operatives: The possibilities and dilemmas of Viswabharati’s Globality”, NMML Occasional Paper: Perspectives in Indian Development, New Series 21 (2013). He has also edited Rabindranath Tagore’s The Home and the World: A Critical Companion, Permanent Black, Delhi, 2002 and Anthem Press, London, 2005.

Download flyer (PDF file)

19 July
(5.30pm)

Nandini Manjrekar (Mumbai)
Social Context and Educational ‘Reform’ in the Sanskarnagari: Baroda in the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century

TRG Event

Venue: German Historical Institute London

Education was central to the imagination of Baroda as an ‘ideal progressive' princely state in the reign of Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III (1875-1939). By the late nineteenth century, Baroda had a range of institutions of higher and technical education, including courses for the modernisation of artisanal crafts, public libraries and museums, institutions for teacher training, a music college, and an acclaimed Oriental Series. Free and compulsory school education for all children formed a key feature of the larger imagination of public education as a signifier of progress in Baroda. The 'Baroda experiment' as it came to be called, was widely debated in its time and also had a productive postcolonial afterlife, finding mention as a key historical referent in the debates on making education a fundamental right for all children in India. This paper explores education in the city of Baroda, often referred to by the epithet ‘Sanskarnagari’, or city of culture. In the extant discourse on Baroda’s educational ‘achievements’, we find the intertwining imaginations of education as a public good, a transformative experience that should be available to all persons across social hierarchies of class, caste, gender, region, and religion. This paper argues that education formed a key focus of the evolution of Baroda as a Sanskarnagari. However, larger questions of education of the city's public remained mired within the contradictions between a liberal ideology of equal educational opportunity and a deeply unequal social structure. The paper examines these contestations in its own time, principally focusing on the late nineteenth and early twentieth century Baroda, where the wider social imagination of its enlightened ruler Sayajirao Gaekwad and the reformist polices he attempted to put into place were set against the social structures of his times.

Nandini Manjrekar is Professor and Dean, School of Education, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai. Her research interests are in the areas of sociology of education, education in conflict areas, gender and schooling and women's studies. She was principal researcher and author of Textbook Regimes: A Study of Nation and Identity in Gujarat (Nirantar, 2010), and author of the chapter on education for a Report on the Girl Child in India (World of Indian Girls, Save the Children India, 2014). Her publications include Images of Hindu Girlhood: Reading Vidya Bharati's Balika Shikshan, (Childhood, 18:3, 2011), Gender, Childhood, and Work in the Nation: Voices and Encounters in an Indian School, in Geetha B. Nambissan and S.Srinivas Rao (eds.), Sociology of Education in India: Changing Contours and Emerging Concerns (Oxford University Press, 2013). In 2015, she contributed a paper for the TRG of the German Historical Institute London, The Neighbourhood and the School: Education, Marginalisation and the State in Gujarat (www.perspectivia.net).

Download flyer (PDF file)

19 October
(5.30pm)

Miriam Rürup (Hamburg)
Imagining Remigration and Return: The Experience of Statelessness and the Idea of Universal Belonging in Postwar Germany

GHIL in co-operation with the Faculty of History, University of Oxford

After 1945 the situation of a huge group of displaced persons was uncertain. Roughly 10,000 out of 280,000 displaced persons living in Germany in 1948 were stateless. Until a law confirming their legal status as homeless foreigners was passed in the FRG in April 1951, these DPs were defined as homeless, stateless foreigners under the auspices of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees. While the ‘right to have a nationality’ was part of the 1948 Declaration of Human Rights, the question of how to deal with stateless people remained unresolved. Different and partly contradictory concepts of how to overcome statelessness competed in the early postwar era. This lecture will explore these concepts, which included practices of forced repatriation in the early postwar months, the Zionist idea of a return to the ‘homeland’, and notions of universal belonging such as World Citizenship.

Miriam Rürup is Director of the Institute for the History of the German Jews in Hamburg. She studied history, sociology, and cultural anthropology at the universities of Göttingen, Tel Aviv, and Berlin, and worked for the Foundation ‘Topography of Terror’ in Berlin, the Rosenzweig Center in Jerusalem, and the Simon Dubnow Institute in Leipzig, at the History Department of Göttingen University, and at the German Historical Institute in Washington. Her research interests lie in German–Jewish history, the history of the Third Reich, gender history, and the history of migration. Among her publications are Ehrensache: Jüdische Studentenverbindungen an deutschen Universitäten, 1886–1937 (2008), a study of the history of German–Jewish student fraternities in Imperial and Weimar Germany, and the edited volume Praktiken der Differenz: Diasporakulturen in der Zeitgeschichte (2009).

Download flyer   (PDF file)