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Dr Debarati Bagchi

Debarati Bagchi was a Postdoctoral Fellow with the TRG from November 2014 to November 2016. Debarati Bagchi joined TRG as a Postdoctoral Fellow in November 2014. She is affiliated to the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Her postdoctoral project is titled “A Script for the Masses? Pedagogic Practices and Didactic Traditions among the Sylhetis.”

Email: bagchidebarati(ghi)gmail.com

Research Interests

The areas of my research interest include spatial histories and histories of frontiers and borderlands, history of Northeast India, histories of language and language politics in colonial India, histories of vernacular education.

Academic Background

2009-2014 PhD at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta and Department of History, University of Delhi.
2007-2008 Research Training Programme, Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta
2003-2005 MA in History , Jadavpur University
2000-2003 BA in History, Jadavpur University

Scholarships and Prizes

2012 Inlaks Shivdasani Research Travel Grant for archival research at UK.
2008–2011 Doctoral Fellowship offered by the Indian Council of Social Science Research, New Delhi.

Research

Current Research

Transnational Research Group Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Historical Studies, JNU.
Research Topic: “A Script for the Masses? Pedagogic Practices and Didactic Traditions among the Sylhetis.”

February – October 2014

Research Associate at the Mahanirban Calcutta Research Group, Calcutta.
Project associated with: Ford Foundation funded project Cities, Rural Migrants and Urban Poor: Issues of Violence and Social Justice.
Research topic – “Women and Children Migrants: A Study of the Urban Workforce in Kolkata.”

March 2009 – January 2014

Doctoral dissertation on: “Many Spaces of Sylhet: Making of a Regional Identity, 1870s – 1940s