German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: Tel. +44-(0)20-7309 2050

URI: www.ghil.co.uk

 

Prizes

 
 

Prize of the German Historical Institute London

 
 

The Prize of the German Historical Institute London is awarded annually for an outstanding Ph.D. thesis on

  • German history (submitted to a British or Irish university),
  • British history or British colonial history (submitted to a German university),
  • Anglo-German relations or Anglo-German comparative history (submitted to a British, Irish, or German university).

The Prize is 1,000 Euros.

To be eligible, applicants must have successfully completed doctoral exams and vivas between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.

Application Details

To apply, send one copy of the thesis with

  •     a one-page abstract
  •     examiners’ reports on the thesis
  •     a brief CV
  •     a declaration that the work will not be published before the judges have reached a final decision
  •     a supervisor’s reference

to reach the Director of the German Historical Institute London, 17 Bloomsbury Square, London WC1A 2NJ, by 31 July 2020. Applications and theses should be sent by email as a PDF attachment to: prize@ghil.ac.uk.

 

If the prize-winning thesis is on British history, British colonial history, Anglo-German relations or Anglo-German comparative history it may also be considered for publication in one of the Institute's publication series.


Prize of the German Historical Institute London 2019

We are delighted to announce that the winner of the 2019 Prize of the German Historical Institute London is Jan Lambertz for her thesis on Early Post-War Holocaust Knowledge and Jewish Missing Persons, submitted to Royal Holloway, University of London.

Previous prize-winners

2018Arun Kumar for Learning to Dream: Education, Aspiration, and Working Lives in Colonial India (1880s–1940s)
2017

Simon Mee for Monetary Mythology: The West German Central Bank and Historical Narratives, 1948–78

Marcel Thomas for Local Lives, Parallel Histories: Villagers and Everyday Life in the Divided Germany

(joint winners)

2016Benjamin Pope for Relationships between Townspeople and Rural Nobles in late Medieval Germany: A Study of Nuremberg in the 1440s
2015Mahon Murphy for Prisoners of War and Civilian Internees Captured by British and Dominion Forces from the German Colonies during the First World War, submitted to the London School of Economics
2014Chris Knowles for Winning the Peace: The British in Occupied Germany, 1945–1948, submitted to King's College London
2013Helen Whatmore for On Co-Existence with a KZ: Bystanders and Concentration Camps in Western Europe 1938–2005, submitted to  University College London
2011David Motadel for Germany’s Policy towards Islam, 1941–1945, submitted to the University of Cambridge
2010Britta Schilling for Memory, Myth, and Material Culture: Visions of Empire in Postcolonial Germany, submitted to the University of Oxford
2009Jana Tschurenev for Imperial Experiments in Education: Monitorial Schooling in India, 1785–1835, submitted to the Humboldt-Universität Berlin
2008Christiane Reinecke for Grenzen der Freizügigkeit: Die Politik der Migrationskontrolle in Großbritannien und Deutschland, 1880–1930, submitted to the Humboldt-Universität Berlin
2007Astrid Swenson for Conceptualising Heritage in 19th- and Early 20th-Century France, Germany and England, submitted to the University of Cambridge
2006Michael Ledger-Lomas for The Idea of Germany in Religious, Educational and Cultural Thought in England, c.1830–1865, submitted to the University of Cambridge
2005Florian Altenhöner for Kommunikation und Kontrolle: Gerüchte und städtische Öffentlichkeiten in Berlin und London 1914–1918, submitted to the Humboldt-Universität Berlin
2004Christian Haase for In Search of a European Settlement: The Königswinter Conference and West Germany – Allied Relations 1939–1973, submitted to the University of Oxford
2003Kristin Anne Semmens for Domestic Tourism in the Third Reich, submitted to the University of Cambridge
2002Jan Rüger for Celebration of the Fleet in Britain and Germany, 1897–1914, submitted to the University of Cambridge
2001Ulrike Lindner for Politik – Gesundheitswesen – Patienten: Maßnahmen und Auswirkungen von Gesundheitspolitik in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland und in Großbritannien 1948–65, submitted to the LMU Munich
2000Nikolaus Braun for Brudermord, Rebellion, Freiheitskrieg? Legitimieren und Handeln im Irischen Bürgerkrieg 1922–1923, submitted to the University of Munich
1998Jörn Leonard for Sprachmengerei und Begriffsverwirrung: Komparative Studien zur historischen Semantik von "Liberalismus" im 19. Jahrhundert. Frankreich, Deutschland, Italien und England im Vergleich, submitted to the University of Heidelberg
1997Lothar Reinermann for Der Kaiser in England: Perzeption und Image Wilhelms II. in der britischen Öffentlichkeit 1888–1920/1, submitted to the University of Duisburg
1996Martin Schaad for Anglo-German Relations during the Formative Years of the European Community, 1955–1961
 
 

Wolfgang J. Mommsen Prize

 
 

In 2010, the German Historical Institute London awarded the Wolfgang J. Mommsen Prize for the first time on the occasion of its Annual Lecture. The Wolfgang J. Mommsen Prize is named in memory of the former director of the German Historical Institute London, who died in 2004. Wolfgang J. Mommsen would have celebrated his eightieth birthday that year.

 

The prize will be awarded to the author of an outstanding piece of German research on British history and covers the cost of translating the work into English and publishing it in the Institute's series Studies in British and Imperial History. The aim of the series is to make German research on British history more accessible to a British readership. Both the prize and the series thus further the Institute’s mission of advancing British–German research in the field of history.

Previous prize-winners

The 2012 winner was Benno Gammerl, who received the award for his Ph.D. thesis Untertanen, Staatsbürger und Andere: Der Umgang mit ethnischer Heterogenität im Britischen Weltreich und im Habsburgerreich 1867–1918, Kritische Studien zur Geschichtswissenschaft, Vol. 189 (Göttingen 2010), which was submitted to the FU Berlin and supervised by Professor Dieter Gosewinkel and Professor Jürgen Kocka. The translation appeared as volume 7 of the series Studies in British and Imperial History under the title Subjects, Citizens, and Others: Administering Ethnic Heterogeneity in the British and Habsburg Empires, 1867–1918 in November 2017.

 

The 2010 winner was Tobias Wolffhardt, who received the award for his Ph.D. thesis Wissensproduktion als Staatsaufgabe: Colin Mackenzie (ca. 1753–1821) und das Projekt eines umfassenden Survey in Indien, which was submitted to LMU Munich and supervised by Professor Eckhart Hellmuth. The prize was awarded on the occasion of the Annual Lecture on 12 November 2010. Dr Wolffhardt's book was published under the title Unearthing the Past to Forge the Future: Colin Mackenzie, the Early Colonial State, and the Comprehensive Survey of India in October 2017.