German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: Tel. +44-(0)20-7309 2050

URI: www.ghil.ac.uk

 

German Historical Institute London

 
 
 
 
Library: opening times and new readers

The library is open Monday-Friday, 9.30am-9pm. Library staff are available for enquiries 9.30am-5pm. After 5pm, the library is staffed by security personnel only and entry is restricted to registered readers with a library card.

Information on becoming a new reader can be found here.

Advent calendar and Christmas closure

We enjoyed creating our online advent calendar so much last year that we decided to do it again this year but with an added bonus: you can also see a physical version of the advent calendar in our Common Room at the GHIL. One door will be opened every day until Christmas Eve, so check for updates on our socials (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) or come and see it in person!

The German Historical Institute London (including the library) will close from Saturday 24th December to Monday 2nd January, re-opening on Tuesday 3rd January.

 
 

Events and Conferences

 

6 December 2022 (2.30pm)

GHIL Colloquium

Lea Börgerding (Berlin)
Women's Internationalism Behind the Berlin Wall - The GDR Women's League, East-South Relations, and Socialist Solidarity during the Global Cold War, 1949–1989

GHIL/Online

6 December 2022 (5.30pm)

GHIL Lecture

Eva Marlene Hausteiner (Erlangen-Nuremberg)
Should Federations be Made to Last?

GHIL

13 December 2022 (3.30pm)

GHIL Colloquium

Beatrice Blümer (Kassel)
Der Liber insularum Archipelagi von Cristoforo Buondelmo

GHIL/Online

 

Call for Papers

 
 

Call for Papers

Medieval History Seminar 2023
5–7 October 2023

Organizers: German Historical Institute London and German Historical Institute Washington
Conveners: Fiona Griffiths (Stanford University), Michael Grünbart (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster), Jamie Kreiner (University of Georgia), Simon MacLean (University of St Andrews), Len Scales (Durham University), and Dorothea Weltecke (Humboldt-Universität Berlin)

German Historical Institute London

Deadline: 31 January 2023

 

GHIL Bulletin

Volume 44 (2022), No. 2

November Issue

Featured Article

Mirjam Sarah Brusius

Memory Cultures 2.0: From Opferkonkurrenz to Solidarity. Introduction

German Historical Institute London Bulletin, vol. 44 (2022), no. 2, 3–20


Featured Article

Manuela Bauche, Patricia Piberger, Sébastien Tremblay, and Hannah Tzuberi

From Opferkonkurrenz to Solidarity: A Round Table

German Historical Institute London Bulletin, vol. 44 (2022), no. 2, 32–85


 

Opportunities

 

Student workshops

Postgraduate Research Students Conference 2023

The German Historical Institute London will hold its 27th postgraduate students conference on Thursday 12 and Friday 13 January 2023. Its intention is to give postgraduate research students in the UK and Ireland working on German history an opportunity to present their work-in-progress, and to discuss it with other students working in the same field. 

German Historical Institute London


Closing date for applications: 15 November 2022


New Publications

Matthias Bähr

Konfessionelle Mehrdimensionalität in der Frühen Neuzeit

Irland um 1600

Veröffentlichungen des Deutschen Historischen Instituts London. Bd 88

Berlin: De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2022

ask librarian

Levke Harders and Falko Schnicke (eds.)

Belonging across Borders

Transnational Practices in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

Studies of the German Historical Institute London

Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2022

ask librarian

Stefan G. Holz

Rolle und Kodex

Die Schriftlichkeit der königlichen Finanzverwaltung Englands unter Eduard I. (1272-1307)

Veröffentlichungen des Deutschen Historischen Instituts London. Bd. 87

Berlin: De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2022

ask librarian

Featured Research

Collaborative Research Project

(De)Constructing Europe – EU-Scepticism in European Integration History

Dr William King and David Lawton at the GHIL

This project explores the important and understudied history of Euroscepticism, and alternative attitudes towards European integration, in Britain. It seeks to build on existing conceptions of Britain and ‘Europe’ and examine the impact and role of different visions and critical views in British society and politics. Focusing on Britain during the 1970s-90s, the project forms one key pillar in a wider collaborative project with colleagues at the German Historical Institutes in Rome and Warsaw, and the Hamburg Institute for Social Research.
William's research focuses on Barbara Castle, the European Parliament and the British Labour Party. It will concentrate on key individuals who actively shaped and influenced the European integration project; many of them held alternative, and at times competing, visions and ideas as to what British membership entailed.
David's project focuses on the emergence of a network of Eurosceptic individuals working in broadcasting, journalism, literature, and in the legal profession from the 1970s to the 2000s. He aims to shed further light on the growth of 'Euroscepticism' outside of Westminster politics and explore the ways in which individuals came together to protest and prophesise about future of European integration.

Read more about Euroscepticism project at the GHIL

Read more about the (De)Constructing Europe project as whole

Read a report from a recent (De)Constructing Europe Conference (London, 7–8 July 2022)

Read a report from a recent (De)Constructing Europe panel discussion (London, 7 July 2022)

Read a report from and/or watch the recent Europa im Widerstand – Widerstand gegen Europa panel discussion (Berlin, 26 September 2022)

Image: Banksy Brexit Mural in Dover, ©Jay Galvin, 2017
Image source: Wikimedia Commons
Image license: CC BY 4.0

 

GHIL Podcast

 

Joint Lecture

Martina Heßler

Flawed Humans, or What Makes Technology Better than Humans:
Historical Considerations on Humans as ‘Faulty Constructions’
25 November 2022 , 0:40 h



Joint Lecture

Martina Heßler

Flawed Humans, or What Makes Technology Better than Humans:
Historical Considerations on Humans as ‘Faulty Constructions’

Joint Lecture

Christina Morina

Broken Balance:
A Political–Cultural History of Germany since the 1980s
16 November 2022 , 0:46 h



Joint Lecture

Christina Morina

Broken Balance:
A Political–Cultural History of Germany since the 1980s

Interview

Maya Caspari and Jane Freeland

Forms, Voices, Networks: Feminism and the Media
23 August 2022 , 0:41 h



Interview

Maya Caspari and Jane Freeland

Forms, Voices, Networks: Feminism and the Media

Latest Blogposts

22 November 2022

Blogpost

Haureh Hussein

Māori Iwi, Quaker Whalers, and Missionaries at the Bay of Islands in Aotearoa/New Zealand (1790–1840)

Among the many records of the Church Missionary Society (CMS) held in the Cadbury Research Library at the University of Birmingham are minutes of a meeting of the CMS committee in London. At this meeting on 9 August 1819 the committee learned from a letter sent by the missionary Thomas Kendall that several whaling captains who had anchored in the Bay of Islands in Aotearoa/New Zealand ‘had been very kind to him and his colleagues’. The ‘Officers of the above ships’, Kendall continued, ‘conducted …

Category: Research, Scholarships


3 November 2022

Blogpost

Katharina Breidenbach

Pastors, Commissaries, Diplomats: Agency and Migration Networks in the Early Modern Period

Confessional migrations, especially Protestant ones, are a defining characteristic of the early modern period.1 Well-known examples include the Huguenots and the Vaudois in the 1690s, the Palatines in 1708, and the Salzburgers in the 1730s. Most of these migrations were structured by networks involving migrants, diplomats, agents, states, and institutions; and just as importantly, money flows, publications, and escape routes. Overall, these migration networks can be seen as power constellations in which diplomats, agents, institutions and state actors were interconnected and influenced each other. …

Category: Research, Scholarships