German Historical Institute London

17 Bloomsbury Square
London WC1A 2NJ
United Kingdom

Phone: Tel. +44-(0)20-7309 2050

URI: www.ghil.ac.uk

 

German Historical Institute London

 
 
 
 
Digital Humanities: new online learning modules on text mining and statistics for historians

We are pleased to offer scholars and students of history access to two free online modules providing instruction in digital humanities methods and techniques. The first module introduces historians to the methods of text mining while the second module teaches them how to use statistics to interpret their research results. Both modules include several units with explanatory videos and skill-building exercises.

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Forthcoming Publication
Coming soon, the new volume in our Studies of the German Historical Institute London series:

Felix Brahm and Eve Rosenhaft (eds.), Global Commerce and Economic Conscience in Europe, 1700-1900 : Distance and Entanglement, (Oxford, 2022)

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Library opening times, masks, and new readers

Our opening hours are Monday to Friday (9.30am-5pm). Readers should wear a face covering when moving around the institute, unless they are exempt. Face coverings can be removed when working at your desk. New readers should book an appointment (email: library@ghil.ac.uk) for a virtual induction before their first visit.

Covid-19 safety measures for visitors

Please wear a face covering. To ensure social distancing, the audience in our conference room is capped at a maximum of 35 attendees. Out of consideration for others, please cancel your booking for an in-person event if you are no longer able to attend. Our conference room is regularly aired. We ask attendees of events to please wear a face covering unless they are exempt, are drinking, or are speaking at the event. You must not visit the institute if you are experiencing symptoms of Covid-19, or if you have recently tested positive for Covid-19.


 
 

Events and Conferences

 

24 May 2022 (2.30pm)

GHIL Colloquium

David Irion (München)
Die Rahmenprogramme der Europäischen Union: Bedeutungsgewinn durch De-Ökonomisierung? (ca. 1980–2002)

GHIL/Online

24 May 2022 (5.30pm)

GHIL Lecture

Martina Steber (Munich)
‘A very English superstar’ : John Rutter, Popular Classical Music, and Transnational Conservatism since the 1970s

GHIL/Online

1 June 2022 (5.30pm)

GHIL Joint Lecture

Ute Frevert (Berlin)
The Power of Emotions in German History

GHIL/Online

23 November 2021 - 23 November 2022

Exhibition

Forms, Voices, Networks

Feminism and the Media

The exhibition Forms, Voices, Networks explores the intersections between the growth of mass media and women’s rights movements in a transnational context during the 20th century. Centred on the histories of feminisms and the media in Britain, Germany and India, it draws attention to little-known or unheard voices and stories and draws connections between activists and the media across time and space.

Developed by the International Standing Working Group on Medialization and Empowerment, curated by Maya Caspari (GHIL) and coordinated by Jane Freeland (GHIL)

Image from See Red Women’s Workshop: ‘Protest’. 1974 (screenprint)

The exhibition is now live, visit it here: www.feminismandthemedia.co.uk

Online


 

Opportunities

 

Prizes

Prize of the German Historical Institute London

The Prize of the German Historical Institute London is awarded annually for an outstanding Ph.D. thesis on German history (submitted to a British or Irish university), British history or British colonial history (submitted to a German university), British-German relations or British-German comparative history (submitted to a British, Irish, or German university). The Prize is 1,000 Euros. To be eligible, applicants must have successfully completed doctoral exams and vivas between 1 August 2021 and 31 July 2022.

Closing date for applications: 31 July 2022


GHIL Bulletin

Volume 43 (2021), No. 2

November Issue

Featured Article

Martina Kessel

An Empire of Shaming: Laughter as Identity Politics in Nazi Germany

German Historical Institute London Bulletin, vol. 43 (2021), no. 2, 3–29


Featured Article

Franziska Neumann

The Realm of Cloacina? Excrement in London’s Eighteenth Century Waste Regime

German Historical Institute London Bulletin, vol. 43 (2021), no. 2, 30-56


New Publications

Andreas Pečar

The Power of Scripture

Political Biblicism in the Early Stuart Monarchy between Representation and Subversion

Studies in British and Imperial History. Vol. 8

New York, NY ; Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2021

María Ángeles Martín Romera and Hannes Ziegler (eds.)

The Officer and the People

Accountability and Authority in Pre-Modern Europe

Studies of the German Historical Institute London

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021

Julian Katz

Kriegslegitimation in der Frühen Neuzeit

Intervention und Sicherheit während des anglo-spanischen Krieges (1585-1604)

Veröffentlichungen des Deutschen Historischen Instituts London. Bd. 86

Berlin: De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2021

ask librarian

Featured Research

New Publication

Visions of community in an Age of Viking threat: presenting a new book by our historian Stephan Bruhn

Reformer als Wertegemeinschaften. Zur diskursiven Formierung einer sozialen Gruppe im spätangelsächsischen England (ca. 850–1050)

English history between 850 and 1050 is generally perceived as an Age of Viking threat, marked by constant raids and invasions from Scandinavia. The book focusses on new visions of community born from moral discourses among reform groups in late Anglo-Saxon England in the Early and High Middle Ages.

As Scandinavian activity in England was seen as a punishment for sinfulness, many felt a need to respond by appeasing God. It is not surprising that monks and clerics were the driving force behind these moral discourses and constituted the group’s core. But reform concerned society as a whole, as everyone had to amend their ways to regain God’s favour. Everyone who held responsibility for others by secular power or pastoral office could become part of the reform group, be they man or woman, king or bishop, ealdorman or noblewoman, priest or nun. The study thus develops a different perspective on the so called “Viking Age” in England beyond warfare and crisis by focussing on the social repercussions these developments could trigger.

Read more about Stephan Bruhn

Read more about our other British History projects

Stephan Bruhn

Reformer als Wertegemeinschaften

Zur diskursiven Formierung einer sozialen Gruppe im spätangelsächsischen England (ca. 850–1050)

Mittelalter-Forschungen. Band 68

Ostfildern: Thorbecke, 2022

 

GHIL Podcast

 

GHIL Lecture

Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann

Charlotte Beradt and Reinhart Koselleck on Dreaming in the Age of Extremes
28 April 2022 , 0:45 h



GHIL Lecture

Stefan-Ludwig Hoffmann

Charlotte Beradt and Reinhart Koselleck on Dreaming in the Age of Extremes

GHIL Lecture

Hannah Ahlheim and Elizabeth Hunter

Sleeping Through the Ages:
Two Lectures on the History of Sleep in the Seventeenth and Twentieth Centuries
12 April 2022 , 0:45 h



GHIL Lecture

Hannah Ahlheim and Elizabeth Hunter

Sleeping Through the Ages:
Two Lectures on the History of Sleep in the Seventeenth and Twentieth Centuries

Joint Lecture

Fabian Klose

The Quest for a New World Order:
International Politics Between Visions of Global Governance and Catastrophic Failures in the 1990s
24 March 2022 , 0:44 h



Joint Lecture

Fabian Klose

The Quest for a New World Order:
International Politics Between Visions of Global Governance and Catastrophic Failures in the 1990s

Latest Blogposts

5 May 2022

Blogpost

Marie Cabadi

Women’s Centres and their Newsletters: Feminist Spaces and Print Cultures in Belgium, France, and the United Kingdom

From about 1969 onwards, women’s centres had proliferated in towns and cities of various sizes—first in the United States, then across the globe, including in the United Kingdom, Belgium, and France. Also called ‘women’s houses’ outside of English-speaking regions, they were places of feminist activism and sociability, aiming to provide services to local women and to participate in the growth of the women’s movement. Usually women-only, they regularly became focal points of local feminist scenes...

Category: ISWG, Research


21 April 2022

Blogpost

Chantal Bsdurrek

A Brotherhood of Soldiers? Concepts of Comradeship 1914–1938

Whether we watch movies, read novels, play video games, look at paintings, or listen to podcasts about the First World War, we encounter expressions of what we consider to be the comradeship of the trenches. The idea of the soldiers holding fast together through all hardships, living together, and loving each other like brothers, even dying for one another, has become a central part of the collective memory of the ‘Great War’...

Category: Research, Scholarships